Setting a foundation

I purchased a billing script to upgrade the one I used just before Mom was diagnosed last year. As things are calming down for me, I decided now would be a good time to start using it. When Mom was diagnosed I placed almost everything on hold.

I paid to have the scripts upgraded to the current version and have data imported. The scripts are great but, because they have many features, have a high learning curve. There were some bugs with the import to resolve. I’m taking the time to go page by page through the manual to learn how to use it before I allow the automated functions to kick in.

True intentions…

Obviously, I bought the billing scripts for business purposes. When it comes to billing people, I take that very seriously. I’ve had a merchant account for a decade and I don’t have chargebacks, false charges…it is very rare for there to be a mistake and when there is, it is swiftly handled. I hate billing errors when they happen to me and I triple hate it if I were responsible for doing it to someone else.

With this new script, I want to make sure everything is right and I feel comfortable using it before turning on the automated functions. If that means I have to read the 200 page manual first, so be it. If I have to manually process transactions, that’s cool. But I’ll be damned if I’m going to place my clients in an unnecessary situation to hurry things up. That’s not the way I roll. Clients come first.

But you see…

The person in it for the money would turn the scripts on and deal with the problems as they come up. Their focus is getting the money, not creating the best experience for their clients, users, etc. I have little patience for that level of irresponsibility. There are times when you have to just “do it” but more often than not, caution to make sure the foundation is stable and strong is a wiser time-saving decision.

The time I’m taking to learn the system inside/out (and asking questions while the work was recently done) allows me to more efficiently handle any problems if they arise or predict issues that might occur and stop them from happening. The developers are more inclined to answer questions right after their migration than later when there is a problem. There is also a time issue on getting the problem quickly resolved. If I didn’t know how and had to research it, that only extends the time the client is inconvenienced. I don’t like that.

One could say…

I have a strong accounting background so I should be able to easily handle any problems that arise. Yes, I have a strong accounting background but I have to make sure that the import data is correct, that the values are being calculated properly, then see if the reports are correct. You think I’m going to assume the reports are right…with a strong accounting background? I’d have to know how to use the scripts to see where the values are coming from.

In the end…

I don’t mind taking the time to go through the manual. Actually, I’m impressed the scripts have a manual so in-depth to go through. I’m not going to take advantage of their kindness. I’m trying to find answers for myself before asking. I do the same thing on Twitter. I only ask something AFTER I researched it first. Google is my friend and I use it. A lot.

In the end, I have a script that can easily and automatically handle hundreds of thousands of clients and millions of transactions. A strong foundation to grow on.