TalkTyme: My Thoughts on Walking Dead: Season 2, Episode 3

This post containers spoilers!!

Inconsistency in character development and a rushed storyline; my thoughts on The Walking Dead: Season 2, Episode 3.

Here are all 6 parts. I haven’t raged this hard in a while, which shows how good Telltale Games is at invoking emotion from their players. More so than other episodes, this one left me wondering about the design and story plot choices Telltale games made.

Clementine

Clementine evolved a lot in this episode. We heard something from her that we haven’t heard before: frustration. I am glad she was able to vent a little because she bore a lot of responsibility this episode, to the point of being very lopsided. In my play through I spoke about this, how much Clementine was expected to do and if she would be better on her own.

Sarah

Her character seems to lack consistency. In the last episode when Carver came to the house, she proved she can be quick thinking, sneaky and very clever…without any direction or instruction. I was looking forward to watching her grow stronger just like Clementine.

Sarah was not the same girl in this episode and I am curious why Telltale opted to undo the very cool thing they did from the last episode – make her strong. It seemed, to me, she was a tool to initiate events in the story line that I think could have been done in more creative ways.

Rushed

That is what this episode felt like – it was rushed. Some of the decisions made during the episode felt like they were made to quickly escalate the story line. Many people voiced concerned about this happening because Telltale Games has taken on many projects. Releasing the episodes on time while maintaining their quality is a difficult task under normal circumstances. Add a heavy work load to that and things can quickly deteriorate.

I enjoyed the episode

I hope the next episode brings more depth to the story line. There are so many unanswered questions. There is a difference between a cliff-hanger in a story and just walking away without “ending” or progressing the story line.