Experience vs. Inexperience Part 2

Let’s continue our discussion about experience vs. inexperienced advice. It’s important to know the difference when you are reading articles on the internet or articulating yourself clearly online.

Bill posted a response (the same one made it my comments section it seems) to my entry about Experience vs. Inexperience.

Haha, thought posting at 3am would give you a couple of hours eh? 🙂 NOT!!!

I didn’t say the talent was “blamed” for the failure of the show. I said the show’s failure would follow them. As I said in my article, their resume even points to this. In the entertainment industry resumes are made with their biggest successful project FIRST (regardless of when it was), not their last employer. It is a known fact that an entertainer’s paycheck is directly dependent on their success…and that is the way it SHOULD be since that is how it works in other careers.

A quote from his response:

First of all, I was specifically talking about internet shows. Actually, FIRST OF ALL, no… I don’t have ANY experience with hiring ANYBODY to be the figurehead or “face” of a show. What I *DO* have experience with is watching a show and determining whether a) it’s good, b) it sucks because of the production (technical issues), c) it sucks because of the script-writing, d) it sucks because the face of the show is entirely talent-less, or e) EVERYTHING about the show sucks.

I have hired entertainers, even for online projects. I am the one that has been in the position of looking at the resumes and making the decision of who makes it and who doesn’t. That takes me from talking about what I think I know to talking about what I’ve experienced (and that was the meat of my article – experience vs. inexperience).

Moving on, let’s say I’m hiring someone. When I see a resume that is made like a traditional one (and not the industry standard) their resume automatically hits the trash. He/she should know better (inexperience).

Let’s say the person is successful (more successes than failures). Success in whatever the person is doing now doesn’t mean success in the next project so that has to be considered as well. That’s an entirely different decision-making process.

That leaves the person with more failed projects than successes. When I see a resume like that I ask myself:

  1. Are they taking any part they can get, including crappy ones?
  2. Is the reason why these projects failed because they have one common denominator: this entertainer?
  3. Has the entertainer taken steps to improve the situation so the next project isn’t a failure?
  4. Is this person REALLY this bad at picking projects or does the person suck in general?

The thought of “Oh, this person is probably a good actor/actress and got a bad deal” doesn’t cross my mind. The resume speaks for itself if the first thing listed, and all the subsequent projects listed, are failures.

When does that entertainer get the opportunity to explain to me what went wrong? When their resume is hitting the trash? If you look at the situation realistically, the situation where this person gets the benefit of the doubt only comes up during these crappy projects that won’t work in the first place because they don’t have the budget to do it right and get “real” talent.

  • But don’t believe me (experienced).
  • Don’t believe the people in the industry that hire entertainers that agreed with me in the comments (experience).
  • And especially don’t believe the entertainers that said in the comments that they experienced exactly what I spoke of (experience).

Continue to believe, from a position of inexperience, what you want to believe. Bringing us full circle….

Experience vs. Inexperience